Satyagraha

Cultural Psychology

Inflation-Adjusted Tuition + Fees in the UC and CalState Systems from 1965 to 2011

with 2 comments

The chart below shows even more clearly how unfair the current tuition and fees for California public universities are.  It removes the effects of inflation by expressing tuition + fees each year in 2011 dollar equivalents.  This permits direct comparisons across time.

Thus, for example, in 1965, a typical UC resident undergraduate student paid the equivalent of $2000 in today’s dollars.  Now the same student would pay more than $11,000.

Because inflation effects are removed in the chart, the dramatic increase over time reflects only misplaced priorities, greed, irresponsibility, and the callous willingness to place students in debt.

Students and their families should not accept this.  To begin, they should demand an immediate moratorium on all tuition and fee increases.

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Written by John Uebersax

December 12, 2011 at 5:37 am

2 Responses

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  1. [...] — $67,000,000 in default so far — so what is the motivation for this band aid? With shooting up hockey-stick style, with measures to perhaps double it in the near future, people will need to be more responsible for [...]

  2. [...] well-to-do, but that will be the result of making it more and more expensive. California schools used to have very low tuition but now they are among the highest in the U.S. Of course, California screwed up its economy so [...]


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